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Sunday
Mar212010

Melbourne Comedy Festival: WHEN THE SEX IS GONE @ The Butterfly Club from 25th March 

 

WINNER 2009 MELBOURNE AIRPORT AWARD ‘BEST NEWCOMER’ 

WINNER 2009 MELBOURNE FRINGE ‘BEST CABARET’ 

NOMINEE 2010 ADELAIDE FRINGE AWARD ‘BEST CABARET’

“Much has been made of Bradson’s winning the Best Newcomer and Best Cabaret awards at the 2009 Fringe Festival, and rightly so. Fringe has been known to get these kinds of things fantastically wrong, but not this time … it is probably the must-see of this year’s upcoming Melbourne International Comedy Festival.‘ 

Read the full review from Inpress Magazine at the bottom. 

A hilarious portrait of eroticism as told by a broken-hearted hermaphrodite. Charlie Martini & Alastair Estaire, a stripper and a boxer, inhabiting the one body, muse over a life lived in the dark belly of desire. A unique story with original songs, this comic cabaret show is ‘guaranteed to SHOCK and AMAZE.’ 

Written and performed by Tommy Bradson, with the assistance of Jacqueline Morton (aka ‘Boris’). 


Venue: The Butterfly Club 204 Bank Street South Melbourne 

Every Thursday, Friday and Saturday of the festival (25-27 March; 1-3, 8-10, 15-17 April)

Time: 10.30 pm 

Ticket price: $22 full / $18 concession and for groups of 8 or more

Bookings: click here or call 03 9690 2000

 

Press reviews:

Via The Age

A VULGAR, vivacious cabaret, this is the story of two personalities inhabiting the one hermaphroditic body: Charlie, a foul-mouthed stripper who describes her multi-gendered body as something Picasso might have painted in his abstract years; and Alastair, an aggressive young boxer (and the slightly less engaging of the two). …. Bradson is compelling, confident and totally owned the stage. A brilliant show, though not for the easily offended.

Click here to read the entire review by Richard Watts.

 

Via The Pun

This cabaret is not for the faint-hearted. It’s raw, gritty, littered with expletives and pulsates with a soundtrack intended to shock. But this is why I loved it. The dialogue is poetic, the score is melodic and Bradson’s performance is nothing short of astounding. His energy creates an almost threatening atmosphere, and it’s a wonderful thing to be so convinced by a character that you believe they may drag you off into a land of debauchery.

Click here to read the entire review by Caroline Buckle.

 

REVIEW - INPRESS MAGAZINE, March 2010 

Tommy Bradson: When the Sex is Gone 

Part stand-up comedy, part dark cabaret, part Angela Carter-style magic realism, When The Sex Is Gone is all surprisingly entertaining and engaging. Like a long novel that, five pages in, you’re suddenly delighted to find stretches to a haemorrhoid-scorching 800, the widely talented Tommy Bradson has us utterly hooked from very early on. Bradson is equally beautiful as a women (the first half of the show) and a man (the second). Given When The Sex Is Gone’s subject - the widely erotic life story of a broken hearted hermaphrodite - this was probably just as well. Bradson may be an actual hermaphrodite him/herself, he/she may not. For our purposes here, it hardly seems to matter. Regardless of sex, Bradson can sing, can crack a wickedly funny joke, is masterful as accents are concerned and, most importantly of all, engages on a level not usually associated with ‘lowely’ artforms such as comedy or cabaret. 

Set piece musical numbers such as Blowjob For Breakfast and I Can’t Fuck Myself So Don’t Tell Me To, while hilarious in and of themselves, and expertly accompanied on piano by composer Jacqueline Morton, do little to telegraph the underlying seriousness of the story. Like all good comedy, there is universality to When The Sex Is Gone, a mordant earnestness swimming just below the surface, a slow-burn kind of poignancy that lingers long after the show is over and it’s all about empathy, perhaps even love. 

Much has been made of Bradson’s winning the Best Newcomer and Best Cabaret awards at the 2009 Fringe Festival, and rightly so. Fringe has been known to get these kinds of things fantastically wrong, but not this time. In the very pages of this publication he has been referred to as ‘a terrifying talent’. In fact, this may be Brave New Comedy, Brave New Theatre, or Brave New Cabaret, possibly a combination of all three and others this reviewer is too dull-witted to fully comprehend. Either way, it is probably the must-see of this year’s upcoming Melbourne International Comedy Festival. 

Tony McMahon 

More reviews from the web:

When the Sex is Gone - Reviews from the web

 

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